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Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36) Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)
includes three metal Bofors anti-aircraft guns, three large six-hole bases, one base plug sprue and one Unit card.

The open desert offers precious little cover from the Stuka dive-bombers of the Luftwaffe. The quick-firing Bofors guns can be relied on to drive away the harassing Axis aircraft before they have a chance to do too much harm.

Check out the Bofors Light AA Troop in the online store here...
Desert Rats
The Desert Rats are the only thing standing in the way of Axis conquest of North Africa. Despite suffering repeated defeats at the hands of Rommel’s Afrika Korps, they remain undaunted. Their speedy Crusader and Honey tanks can run circles around their opposition, backed up by the heavier Grant squadrons. Their motorised infantry are equally adept in attack or defence. With support from the Royal Artillery and the Desert Air Force, they are a formidable and versatile force. 

Learn more about Desert Rats here...
Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)

Honey Armoured Troop (BBX32)

The Bofors 40 mm gun, often referred to simply as the Bofors gun, is an anti-aircraft/multi-purpose autocannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most widely used anti-aircraft systems during World War II.

Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36) Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)

The British Army had first examined the weapon when they received a number of Polish-built examples in 1937 for testing. A licence was acquired and the original design modified to suit mass production as well as converting the measurements from metric to imperial.

Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36) Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)
The Bofors became the Army's standard light anti-aircraft weapon and by the end of the war factories in Britan, Canada and Australia had manufactured over 19,000.
Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36) Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)
In British army service the Bofors found a highly specialised role: during the North Africa Campaign at the Second Battle of El Alamein, they were used to fire tracer horizontally to mark safe paths for units through the German minefields. This practice was further developed during operations in North-West Europe, where bursts of colour-coded tracer were used to define the axis of advance of the different formations in large-scale night attacks.
Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36) Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)
The gun could fire up to 120 rounds per minute but in practice it was closer to 80-100 rounds per minute as the rounds were fed into the breech from four round clips which had to be replaced by hand. It's fearsome rate of fire and high velocity shell made it a useful improvised anti-tank weapon.
Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36) Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)
Contact the customer service team at customerservice@battlefront.co.nz if you have issues with any components.
Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)
Bofors Light AA Troop Card (x1) Plastic Bases
Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36) Bofors Light AA Troop (BBX36)

Boot Camp Battle Report
Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats
To conclude the lessons laid out in the 4th Edition Boot Camp, Phil and James put the theory into practice by playing a 62-point game using the Free For All mission.

Boot Camp Battle Report: Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats...

Boot Camp Battle Report: Afrika Korps vs. Desert Rats


Last Updated On Wednesday, June 7, 2017 by Charlie at Battlefront